Friday, June 2, 2017

The work behind a video digital collection in CUHK Digital Repository - A Grain of Sand: Poems from Hong Kong

What do you expect from a video digital collection? Fast streaming? High-definition pictures? Clear voices? Whenever our Digital Servi... thumbnail 1 summary
What do you expect from a video digital collection? Fast streaming? High-definition pictures? Clear voices? Whenever our Digital Services Team has the opportunity to handle a digital collection with audio and video items, we will investigate various ways to exploit the full potential of the collection. For instance, in “Chinese Women and Hong Kong Christianity: An Oral History Archive” which has audio and video clippings, images, and other formats of materials, they are all put together as a collection so that users can easily trace through all materials relating to the oral history of the interviewee like the following.  Another example is “United College General Education Senior Seminar Papers Database”.  Again, all materials relating to the paper are grouped together as a collection.



In a recently launched video digital collection, namely, “A Grain of Sand: Poems from Hong Kong”, we experimented a few feature available in our Repository system (Islandora) to let users have a new experience in listening to English poems.
 
This video digital collection is a collaboration project between the Library and the Department of English. It consists of 33 video recordings of 4 poets that have connections with The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) in different capacities: Louise Ho , Andrew Parkin, Eddie Tay and Kit Fan. They recited their own poems about Hong Kong, and CUHK in particular, in a spectacular background of some landmarks in Hong Kong and CUHK campus.
 

In order to let users visualize the poems not only in beautiful pictures but also in words, we used a new Islandora module called Oral Histories Solution Pack to display the subtitles of the poem in the video and in the time-coded transcript viewer underneath the video. This solution pack is developed by University of Toronto Scarborough Library, and the program codes are shared freely in Github with the Islandora community so that Islandorians including CUHK Library are able to share and contribute what we have enhanced back to the community.  This is the main benefit of using an open source software.  For more details of the Oral Histories Solution Pack, please refer to:  


 
To prepare for display of subtitles, the team has evaluated different subtitles editing tools including those available in the GitHub site mentioned above.  Finally, an open source editor for video subtitles called Subtitle Edit (http://www.nikse.dk/SubtitleEdit/) was adopted as it is relatively easy to use and suitable for our project size and requirement.
 
The digital texts are provided by the English Department.  We made use of the Subtitle Edit to provide time code for all 33 video clips.  The following is screenshot of the application. 

The next step is to use the application to export the subtitles into WebVTT XML files that are suitable for the Solution Pack’s requirement.  Subtitle Edit is able to export the timecoded subtitles into various formats.
 
It also offers functions like “Templating Export” as in Open Refine (http://openrefine.org/) that we also make use of when preparing MODS file.


With these handy tools and the effort of the whole team, we are able to deliver the project within just a few weeks. We are now proud to present this new collection to the world so that users can appreciate the value of English poems. 
We value any collaboration with Faculty.  Our services can be found here. Please let us know if there are any opportunity to create some interesting digital collections within our CUHK community.

Thursday, May 18, 2017

The first CUHK Library Digital Scholarship Symposium “Exploring Digital Scholarship Research at CUHK and Beyond” held successfully

On 31 March 2017, the CUHK Library organized the first Digital Scholarship Symposium with the theme “ Exploring Digital Scholarship Rese... thumbnail 1 summary

On 31 March 2017, the CUHK Library organized the first Digital Scholarship Symposium with the theme “Exploring Digital Scholarship Research at CUHK and Beyond” that was held at the Digital Scholarship Lab, G/F of University Library.  Six speakers from different disciplines presented their latest digital scholarship projects, attracting over 60 researchers, research students and librarians.

As a 1st anniversary event of the Digital Scholarship Lab, the Symposium aims at providing an avenue for all scholars interested in and conducting research in digital scholarship to get together to share their research, to further spark off more research in this area, and to enhance the partnership between the CUHK Library and the Faculty in conducting and supporting digital scholarship research.



The Symposium was officiated by Prof. Fanny M.C. CHEUNG, Pro-Vice-Chancellor/Vice-President and Ms. Louise JONES, University Librarian of CUHK.  There were six presentations on network analysis, data visualization, GIS and big data analysis. They were:


  1. Prof. HUANG Bo from Department of Geography and Resource Management, CUHK: GIS and Big Data for Urban Applications
  2. Prof. LAI Chi-Tim from Department of Cultural and Religious Studies, CUHK: Guangzhou Daoist and Popular Temples Studies and the Development of Daoist Digital Museum
  3. Ms. Kitty Siu from Library, CUHK: A Collaborative Project in Opening Research Data: Archaeological Sites Mapping in China with GIS
  4. Dr. TSUI Lik-hang from China Biographical Database Project (CBDB), Harvard University: A Cyberinfrastructure for Studying Chinese History: A Proposal Based on the Experience of the China Biographical Database Project
  5. Prof. Angela WU from School of Journalism and Communication, CUHK: Re-presenting Web Use as Networks
  6. Prof. Michelle YE from Department of Translation, CUHK: The Social Network of an Early Republican Literary Magazine: a Visualization with Gephi






The post-symposium workshop in the afternoon by Dr. Tsui introduced the use of China Biographical Database (CBDB) and incorporation in other tools such as MARKUS for China studies.  The digital tools presented in the workshop sparked very lively discussion among participants.  More photos about the symposium can be found here.   


The Library is very grateful for the enthusiastic support from the Faculty and the participants. The Library will continue to support research activities across the entire research life cycle by leveraging the latest digital technologies.


Friday, March 17, 2017

1st anniversary of the CUHK Digital Repository πŸ˜€πŸŽ‚πŸŽˆ

Today is the 1st anniversary of the CUHK Digital Repository ( http://repository.lib.cuhk.edu.hk ). Over the past year, we have ingested over... thumbnail 1 summary
Today is the 1st anniversary of the CUHK Digital Repository (http://repository.lib.cuhk.edu.hk). Over the past year, we have ingested over 1 million objects into the system. The objects include those items migrated from our legacy digital collections and also new items for our newly built digital collections.
Meanwhile, in this month, the repository platform also recorded more than 1 million access to our objects.

We will highlight some of our collections and their items in the next blog posts.

Thursday, January 12, 2017

Workshops on AIMS and Research Portal (Feb to May 2017)

The Library is pleased to arrange a series of AIMS and Research Portal workshops for researchers and postgraduate students. CUHK researchers... thumbnail 1 summary
The Library is pleased to arrange a series of AIMS and Research Portal workshops for researchers and postgraduate students. CUHK researchers and staff are all welcome to join the workshops. Interested postgraduate students are also welcome to attend.
Managing your Research Output in AIMS
AIMS is the new Academic Information Management System of CUHK. This workshop aims at demonstrating to you:
  • What is AIMS and its public interface Research Portal
  • The easy way to use AIMS for managing your research outputs
  • Significant features of Research Portal
Date Time Medium of Instruction Registration
20 Feb (Mon) 9:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Cantonese (Powerpoint in English) Click here to register
7 Apr (Fri) 9:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Cantonese (Powerpoint in English) Click here to register
26 Apr (Wed) 2:15 p.m. – 4:15 p.m. Cantonese (Powerpoint in English) Click here to register
18 May (Thu) 2:15 p.m. – 4:15 p.m. English Click here to register
Venue: ITSC Training Room 2, Pi Ch’iu Building (Room 103 + 105)
Archiving Research Outputs in AIMS’ Research Portal
There are lots of benefits in depositing the full text of your research outputs in AIMS that can be openly accessed in Research Portal. These include showcasing excellence of your research, increasing the chance of getting more citations for your output, more discoverable in the research community, etc. This workshop is to demonstrate:
  • The easy way of depositing the full text of your output
  • The right copy of full text that should be used for depositing
  • Ways of handling copyright issues that may arise
Date Time Medium of Instruction Registration
20 Feb (Mon) 11:45 a.m. – 12:45 p.m. Cantonese (Powerpoint in English) Click here to register
7 Apr (Fri) 11:45 a.m. – 12:45 p.m. Cantonese (Powerpoint in English) Click here to register
26 Apr (Wed) 4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Cantonese (Powerpoint in English) Click here to register
18 May (Thu) 4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. English Click here to register
Venue: ITSC Training Room 2, Pi Ch’iu Building (Room 103 + 105)
Open Access and Scholarly Publishing
As a new model of scholarly publishing, open access (OA) is widely discussed in the academic community. This workshop will introduce to you:
  • Concepts, types and importance of OA publishing model
  • Pros and cons of OA
  • OA and AIMS
  • Publishing in OA journals
Date Time Medium of Instruction Registration
28 Mar (Tue) 10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Cantonese
(English might be used if users require.)
Click here to register
Venue: User Education Room 1, G/F, University Library
Workshops on AIMS and Research Portal (Feb to May 2017)
Workshops on AIMS and Research Portal (Feb to May 2017)

Workshops on AIMS and Research Portal (Feb to May 2017)

Wednesday, January 4, 2017

Digital Scholarship: Applications of GIS in Society II

Last week we have introduced some use of GIS in visualizing different types of data.  In CUHK there are some researchers having used GI... thumbnail 1 summary


Last week we have introduced some use of GIS in visualizing different types of data.  In CUHK there are some researchers having used GIS in visualizing their research projects.  Here we will introduce a few examples.

SpatioEpi

Launched in 2006, this project was initiated by SPH Stanley Ho Centre for Emerging Infectious Diseases and students from the Department of Geography and Resource Management.

The aim of SpatioEpi is to popularize the study of geographic distribution of health conditions, disease and environmental factors as they relate to the human population.  In fact they have produced many maps displaying spatial data on current issues, e.g. the recent (Dec 2016) smog in China: Smog the silent killer.


Walking Through Sheung Wan

The project is done by Prof. Sidney Cheung from Department of Anthropology.  It is a "knowledge transfer project" in which an anthropological perspective was used to show how the knowledge of  the local community about Sheung Wan is "transferred" to visitors "for a better understanding of Hong Kong".  It made use of 3 "vitural tours" to show people how the streets looked like with the scenes of all the shops in the street: Wing Lok Street, Ko Shing Street (selling Ginseng, dried seafood, etc.) and Bonham Strand West (selling Chinese herbs).


Daoist Digital Museum

Developed by Prof. LAI Chi-tim and his research team from Centre for Studies of Daoist Culture, the website is the first “Daoist Digital Museum” in the world.  They used WebGIS to display the geographical locations of the Daoist temples in Guangzhou, no matter they still exist or not, and embed them with images, videos, digital texts about the temples.  Their aim is to help "scholars of Daoism, Chinese religion and even historians interested in the city of Guangzhou to perform quantitative analyses of the geographic distribution of temples in Guangzhou and on their relationship with the surrounding socio-economic environment, changes in population and environment, by tracing the development of particular temples."



Sometimes when no GIS application can be used, spatial data can still be visualized in an interesting way.  A project from the I.CARE of CUHK used hand-drawing map to display the Sha Tau Kok town and its community facilities: 「η€Ύε€ζŽ’η΄’ - εšηΎ€ζ²™ι ­θ§’ι•·θ€…ζœε‹™θ¨ˆεŠƒ」(in Chinese only).

Although it does not involve the use of GIS software and application, and as a matter of fact,  Sha Tau Kok town is frontier closed area (FCA) and there is no street view available yet in Google map, the hand-drawing map will also enable people who have not been to the area before to have a basic impression about the town.  


GIS can be used in all subject areas, as it helps visualizing data with spatial aspect, and some powerful software can help performing analysis, which helps researchers in digging out important trends behind the data.

Friday, December 23, 2016

Digital Scholarship: Applications of GIS in Society I

A geographic information system (or GIS) is a system designed to capture, store, manipulate, analyze, manage, and present spatial or geog... thumbnail 1 summary

A geographic information system (or GIS) is a system designed to capture, store, manipulate, analyze, manage, and present spatial or geographical data related to positions on Earth’s surface. GIS can be used in data visualization, network analysis and statistical analysis, and therefore, GIS has become a common buzzard, heavily cited by scholars, city planners and journalists.

The Rising Trends of Data Visualization through Mapping

There are various ways of applying GIS in our society, enriching our understanding and imagination of the world order. Besides the traditional statistical graphing, like pie chart and scatter graph, the journalists and social scientists like to use GIS to represent the electoral data in geographical dimensions. The use of GIS could help capture the spatial variation across the nation and enable further analysis of the impacts of different socio-economic variables - a kind of what we now call "infographics".

Below are some examples of social application of GIS:

I. Electoral Studies

The journalists and social scientists would like to apply GIS into Electoral Studies. Surrounding the controversial US presidential in 2016, there has been an influx of election maps analyzing the electoral data with spatial dimension. One interesting work is “How the Electoral Map Would Look If Only [X] Voted” created by Ste Kinney-Fields published on October 31, projecting the election results if only one demographic group voted:

Source: 2016 US Presidential Electoral Map If Only [X] Voted, http://brilliantmaps.com/if-only-x-voted/

The CityLab from Atlantic Media has also created an interesting 3-D map specifically charting the broad patterns of the 2016 presidential results across America’s metro areas. Donald Trump performed better with more red on the map, although Hilary Clinton scored big victories in the Boston-New York-Washington Corridor and the border metros:


Source: Mapping How America's Metro Areas Voted http://www.citylab.com/politics/2016/12/mapping-how-americas-metro-areas-voted/508313/ 

II. Community Research

Apply mapping techniques with GIS, the social scientists could also explore the socio-spatial ethnic segregation.  Jill Hubley, a Brooklyn web developer, has mapped New York’s languages, ranging from the tongues of African nations to Korean to Yiddish:
Source: The Ultimate Map of New York's Non-English Languages: http://www.citylab.com/design/2016/11/languages-spoken-in-new-york-city-map/506054/


III. Art

It can be very beautiful to visualize data to graphics and the use of GIS can be a medium of such innovative art. Dorothy, the London studio, has published an art map, 'The World Song Map'. The printed names on the creative map are actually music references:
Source: Every Single Name on This Entrancing Map Is a Music Reference https://www.wired.com/2016/11/every-single-name-entrancing-map-music-reference/


The above are just some examples in using GIS to visualize non-textual or even textual data in a beautiful way.  In the next post we will introduce some projects done in CUHK.

Tuesday, October 4, 2016

Open Access Day (24 Oct 2016)

The Open Access Day is to share with the University community the benefits of opening up research. Themed as “ Open in Action – Enhancin... thumbnail 1 summary


The Open Access Day is to share with the University community the benefits of opening up research. Themed as “Open in Action – Enhancing Research Impact @CUHK AIMS”, the event is tied in with the International Open Access Week to highlight the needs of taking action now to open up research through the new Academic Information Management System (AIMS) and the institutional repository Research Portal. This new system provides a new avenue for the dissemination of research outputs, showcasing the research excellence of the University and facilitating international networking and collaboration. Opening and sharing research is the means to reap these benefits.
A mixture of programmes are organized below running from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on that day. The Opening Ceremony will be held at the Beacon and officiated by Prof. Benjamin Wah, Provost, Prof. Fanny Cheung, Pro-Vice-Chancellor / Vice-President, Prof. Lutz Christian Wolff, Dean of the Graduate School, Prof. Walter Ho, Director of ORKTS, and Ms. Louise Jones, University Librarian. You are welcome to register at here.

Open Access Day Programme

Time Program Speaker(s) / Officiating Guests Venue
10:00-17:00
Exhibition on Open Access
(On display until 31 October 2016)
Self Service Area,
G/F, University Library
Hands-on trial of AIMS
Seminar Room,
Digital Scholarship Lab, G/F, University Library
10:00-11:00
Open Access Publishing Talk - Global Trends on Open Access Publishing – the view from Taylor & Francis
Ms. Lyndsey DIXON
Regional Journals Editorial Director, APAC, Taylor & Francis
User Education Room 1,
G/F, University Library
11:00-11:45
Open Access Publishing Talk - Cambridge University Press and Open Access -
A University Publisher’s Perspective
Mr. Joe NG
Acquisitions Editor for Law
and Social Sciences,
Cambridge University Press
12:00-12:30
Opening Ceremony
Officiated by

Professor Benjamin W. WAH
Provost
 Professor Fanny M.C. CHEUNG
Pro-Vice-Chancellor/Vice-President
Professor Lutz-Christian WOLFF
Dean, Graduate School
Professor Walter K. K. HO
Director, Office of Research and Knowledge Transfer Services
 Ms. Louise JONES
University Librarian
Digital Scholarship Lab, G/F, University Library

(FaceBook Live Broadcast)
12:30-13:00
A Dialogue between Provost and University Librarian – Open Access in Action
Professor Benjamin W. WAH
Provost
Ms Louise JONES
University Librarian
14:30-15:30
Open Access in Different Perspectives – Experience Sharing with CUHK Faculty
Professor Chi Tim LAI
Professor, Department of Cultural and Religious Studies, Faculty of Arts
Professor Jyh-An LEE
Assistant Professor,
Faculty of Law
Professor Edmund Anthony Severn NELSON
Clinical Professional Consultant,  Department of Paediatrics,
Faculty of Medicine
Professor C. M. Jimmy YU
Head, United College
Professor, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science
Visualisation Room, Digital Scholarship Lab, G/F, University Library
16:00-17:00
Repositories - institutional, subject and social – conflict or connectivity?
Mr. Aaron TAY
Manager, Library Analytics & Research Librarian, Accounting, Singapore Management University Library
Visualisation Room, Digital Scholarship Lab, G/F, University Library
(Webinar)